Category Archives: Food Preservation

Green Vegetables :Juice Preservation

This year we have abundant green vegetables in our garden. We planted three types of Kale, lettuce, and Swiss Chard.  We eat a lot of salad, we mix it in stir-fry, we steam-cook, and we did some juicing, too. We got too much that we have to save them for later use. I froze some greens (after blanching it),  and saved some green juice as well. Nothing special, but I am sharing this DIY  food preservation with you.  Frozen Kale greens (juice) come handy whenever you want it in your smoothie or fresh juice.

 

KALE GREEN JUICE :FROZEN

Classification: Vegan

Good source of fiber, vitamins and minerals, alkaline

INGREDIENTS:

Kale greens or mixed green vegetables (fresh)

WHAT YOU NEED:

Juicer set

Wraps, small containers, or ice cube tray for freezing.

Note: The ice candy/popsicle plastic wraps I used you can buy online or at an Asian market.

PREPARATION:

1. Wash Kale greens throughly. Check for bugs and bad spots.

2. Process in a juicer; stems and leaves. (Follow juicer instructions carefuly.)

3. Put the processed juice in a wrap or mold. Secure lids or packs.

4. Place packed Kale juice in a freezer.

Frozen Kale juice should be ready after 8 hours in the freezer. Mix it in fresh juice, smoothie. Keeps your drinks cool, too! Enjoy, and stay healthy!

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Homemade Green Bean Pickles (Dilly Bean) :Canned

I missed to post this recipe when it was still Summertime in the US. Well, regardless of the time of the year I decided to share it with those who might be interested in making Green Beans Pickles.  My life has been pretty busy since baby number 2 came along. Thankfully I was able to manage the garden (with my husband’s help mostly on the weekends), do some canning and food preservation, on top of my daily routine as a homemaker and mom to my boys. Life is good when you embrace it in a most optimistic way! 🙂

Okay, let’s talk about the recipe. It is easier when you have done canning before. But don’t be afraid to experiment carefully. In most of my pickle recipes I use similar brine recipe — Check out my Okra and Cucumber Pickles Recipe, with only a little twerk on spices and amounts. Just like any other pickles, Pickled Green Beans (also known as Dilly Beans) has an option to use sugar as part of the ingredient. In this recipe I did not put any sugar, however, if you are the type of person that likes sweet and sour food you may want to experiment by adding some sweetener. Just make sure that the sweet, salt and sour taste is balanced.

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PICKLED GREEN BEANS (Using water-bath process with refrigerated pickle green beans option.)

Classification: Vegetarian
Good source of fiber, vitamin K, manganese, vitamin C, folate, B-vitamins, chromium, calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, omega-3, and many more…

Things you need:

water-bath canner (or a big pot), cooking stove, 3 quart canning jars with rings and lids, jar lifter,

INGREDIENTS:

green beans –  3-4 lbs {about 1 and half kg.])

water – 4 cups

apple cider vinegar (or fresh lemon juice, or white vinegar) – 3 cups (I don’t use equal ratio of water and vinegar, as I like my pickle to be more pleasant to my taste bud 🙂 )

salt (prefer canning/pickling salt) – 5 tablespoon (about 1/3  cup)

garlic – 1 clove (at least 6 pieces, 2 pieces each jar)

onion – medium size, strips

dill seeds – 1-2 tablespoons (1/2 teaspoon per jar)

mustard seeds (optional) – 1-2 tablespoon (1/2 teaspoon per jar)

chili powder  (optional,if you want a little spicy taste) – 1/4 teaspoon or a whole piece/diced of fresh hot pepper

PREPARATION:  Water-bath canning

Note: Don’t be confused as to why Pickled Green Beans is processed by water bath. Most homemade canned pickles are done by water boiling process, even though Green beans is a type of vegetable. The sour (acidic) brine is what makes it capable to process in water bath (boiling process). Unlike canning plain vegetables (except for tomatoes, and most fruits, because it is naturally acidic) they must be pressure-canned to cook the vegetable thoroughly, and to prevent bad bacterial growth that could cause botulism.

  1. Prepare the canning materials: Wash jars in hot soapy water (or in a dishwasher), rinse and set aside. Read here for more information and instructions on canning.
  2. Prepare Ingredients: Select fresh and tender green beans. Trim the ends. Wash and drain properly.
  3. In a big pot put 4 cups of water, apple cider vinegar, and salt (and sugar if necessary). Bring it to a boil for about 3 minutes. Set aside until jars are filled and ready. In another small pot, boil some water with the canning rings and lids in it. Simmer for about 2 minutes.
  4. At the bottom of the jars place 2 pieces of garlic (or 1 at bottom, the last piece on top of green beans), half a teaspoon dill seeds, onion strips (about 10 thin slices), and half a teaspoon mustard seeds. Arrange green beans tightly but gently. If there is enough space above, you can add a few more onion slices. Make sure you leave about an inch head space from the jar rim. Note: Increase the amount of cider vinegar or lemon if you want stronger (higher acidity) brine. Increase also the amount of salt. You can add more spices of your choices. More garlic or onions if you want. 
  5. Once the jars are filled, pour the brine into the jars (using a canning funnel). Leave an inch space from the rim. Wipe the rims with a damp washcloth. Put lids and rings on, tightening evenly.
  1. Place filled jars into the canning pot, with water about an inch above the jars. Bring water to a boil for about 15 minutes — depending on how fast the water heats up. Some preparations only require to keep the pickles-filled-jars in an almost boiling water to prevent the vegetable from getting too soft —not leaving the pickles boiling for too long in the water.7. After the process, remove jars using a jar lifter. Set on a towel and let it cool. Avoid extreme temperature change. Cover the top with another towel if necessary.8. After jars have cooled off; check for seal, lids have to be sucked down, not bulged out. Pickles in unsealed jars can be consumed first or be put in the refrigerator. Label jars or lids: name of the finished product, date or year. (Ex. Pickled Green Beans (A.Cider), 2015). Store in dark, cool temperature.Suggested Measurement for smaller batches: (If for some reason your brine preparation was not enough)

    3 cups water
    1 and 1/2 cups – cider vinegar/freshly squeezed lemon juice
    2 and 1/2 – 3 tablespoon salt (preferably canning salt because it is pure, no anti-caking agent

To make Refrigerated Green Bean Pickles using the same recipe.

A. Blanch green beans in boiling water for 15 seconds. Wash with icy-cold water right away to prevent further cooking, and preserve natural crispiness.
B. Arrange spices and green beans in jars. Add brine. Cover and refrigerate!
C. Enjoy after 24 hours!

Green Beans Preparation

Green Beans Preparation

Boiling Process

Boiling Process

Pickled Green Beans (Dilly Beans)

Pickled Green Beans (Dilly Beans)

Homemade Pickled Okra :Canned

I have to post this recipe as I have friends wanting me to share it. We have lots, I mean lots of okra produce from our garden. And the plants are still producing! We sold some, we ate a bunch, and I preserved some, too. Making Okra pickles is not much different than making Cucumber Pickles and Dilly Green Beans Pickles. The brine solution and acidity are about the same unless you want a little twerk: adding more spices, adding sugar, eliminating ingredients you don’t like (in this recipe). I prefer sour pickles over sweet & sour. If You want to add sugar in this recipe just make sure that the salt, sour and sweet flavor is balance. I don’t like super strong, high acidity brine, so I use 2:1 ratio (2 cups water, 3/4 to 1 cup vinegar/fresh lemon juice).

NOTE: You can make Refrigerated Okra Pickles using this recipe. No water bath process needed! Scroll down to read more…
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Classification: Vegetarian
Category: Canning and Food Preservation

INGREDIENTS:

Okra (smaller sizes)- 4 to 5 pounds (2-3 kilos)
water – 6 cups
apple cider vinegar – 3 cups (fresh lemon juice is another good option)
salt (prefer pickling salt) – 1/3 cup (5 tablespoons)
garlic cloves – 2 pcs per jar
red bell pepper – few strips slices per jar
coriander seeds – 1/2 teaspoon per jar
mustard seeds – 1/2 teaspoon per jar
dill seeds – 1/4 teaspoon per jar (optional)

Simplest Ingredients’ Alternative

Okra, water, vinegar (prefer organic natural), salt, garlic cloves, bell pepper, onion slices, 2 lemon slices to place at the bottom of the jar. You can also put chili pepper or 1/2 teaspoon (or more chili) powder if you like hot and spicy food.

WHAT YOU NEED:

4 quart canning jars with lids and rings
Water bath canner
Jar lifter
Cooking stove

PREPARATION:

1. Select the freshest, young okra. Wash and drain. Cut blossom ends, leave the head but trim to a shorter length.

2. Prepare the canning equipment. Wash and clean canning jars with warm water. You can also wash it in dishwasher. Read here for more information on water bath canning.

3. In a big pot, put water, apple cider vinegar, and salt. Bring it to boil for about 3 minutes.

4. Arrange okra, garlic, peppers, in the canning jars. Pack tightly. Add other seasonings: coriander seeds, mustard seeds, dill seeds. Make sure there is about an inch space left above the okras.

5. Pour the brine up to the neck of the jar, covering the okras. Leave about an inch space below the lids.

6. Wipe the rims of the jars with clean, damp, washcloth to remove debris that could affect the sealing process.

7. In a canning pot, fill some water about half to three-fourth full, and bring it to boil. Let it sit until jars are ready for canning process.

8. Place the filled jars in the canning rack. Add water to the boiling water if necessary to make sure that water covers the jars (about an inch above the lids). You can also place a hand towel at the bottom of the pot (if you have no rack available for use), to avoid breaking the jars.

9. Bring the water to boil and process for 15 minutes.

Note: Don’t be confused as to why pickled okra is processed by water bath. Most homemade canned pickles are done by water boiling process, even though Okra is a type of vegetable. The sour (acidic) brine is what makes it capable to process in water bath (boiling process). Unlike canning plain vegetables (except for tomatoes, because it is naturally acidic) they must be pressure-canned to cook the vegetable thoroughly, and to prevent bad bacterial growth that could cause botulism.

10. Using a jar lifter remove the jars from the pot and set it on a towel. Cover the jars with towels to prevent drastic temperature change.

11. Wait for the lids to seal. If you hear popping sound (the suction pressure), it means the jar has been sealed. When jars have cooled off (after 8 hours), check for unsealed jars. Lids must be sucked down, not bulge out. You can re-process the content of the unsealed jars by transferring it to a new, clean jar. OR you can refrigerate it, and enjoy after 24 hours!

12. Put label on each jar: Name, date, ingredients, etc. You may or may not remove the jar rings/bands. If you intend to keep it longer in the pantry, taking the rings off will help prevent rust from forming around the rim.

Your canned pickled okra will be best eaten after 24 hours. Shelf life is 6 months up to 2 years… and longer, whenever you open it! I still have canned pickled okra from three years ago and they are still fine! 🙂

Note:
You can do refrigerated Pickled okra (without doing the water bath canning process) using the same ingredients, except you will need to boil all the ingredients (except onions and peppers) before pouring the brine into the jars. Refrigerated pickled okra will keep well in the refrigerator for several weeks. Enjoy the crunch!

Pickling Okra

Boiling Process for Pickling Okra

Boiling Process for Pickling Okra

Homemade Pickled Okra - Canned

Cucumber Pickles

Cucumber Pickles (Dill) :Homemade with Lemon Juice Brine Option

What to do with extra cucumbers — other than eating them fresh in salad, or juice form? Make some pickles! My husband prefers dill cucumber pickles over bread & butter pickles (the sweet and sour). I eat both, but when I am canning I make more dill cucumber pickles. It is very easy. If you don’t have everything as listed in this recipe, it’s okay, as long as you have the main ingredients:cucumbers, vinegar/lemon juice, water, salt… and a few other common spices like garlic, onion bulb or green onions, you can make pickles. 🙂 Have fun and enjoy your pickles!

More related food preservation recipes.
Canned Green Beans
Canned Blackberries
Canned Pasta Sauce
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DILL(Cucumber) PICKLES :Homemade with Lemon Brine Option
Classification: Vegan

Things needed: Water-bath canner, canning (mason) jars with rings & lids, jar lifter, see canning instruction here for more information. The recipe below is made for a batch of pickles — 7 jars. Adjust the amount of ingredients if necessary.

Note: You can make a Refrigerated Dill Cucumber Pickles using this recipe –without doing the water bath, canning process.

Ingredients:

cucumbers – half an inch, round sliced (or whole small cucumbers or cut into wedges)
water – 8 cups
organic apple cider vinegar or lemon juice- 2 and 1/2 (to 3 cups for a stronger brine)
salt (preferably pickling salt) – 3/4 cups (to 1 cup for stronger brine)
garlic cloves (peeled) – 14 pieces
onions – strip slices
dill seeds – 1/2 teaspoon per jar (fresh dill leaves can also be used)
mustard seeds – 1/4 teaspoon per jar
coriander seeds – 1/4 teaspoon per jar (optional)
young grape leaves – 14 pieces

Preparation:

1. Prepare all the canning materials: Wash jars in hot soapy water (or in a dishwasher), rinse and set aside. Read here for more information and instructions on canning.

2. Prepare all the pickle ingredients: Cucumbers rinsed and sliced. Garlic peeled, and onion sliced.

3. Boil 8 cups of water, apple cider vinegar (or lemon juice), salt, in a bigger pot. Set aside when done. In another small pot, boil some water with the canning rings and lids in it. Simmer for about 2 minutes.

Note: Increase the amount of cider vinegar or lemon if you want stronger (higher acidity) brine. Increase also the amount of salt.

4. Fill jars: Place 1 garlic piece at the bottom of each jar, 1 grape leaf (to keep the cucumbers fresher and crispier longer in jars), along with dill seeds (or dill leaves), mustard seeds, coriander seeds. Tightly load the cucumbers into the jar. Arrange well by pressing the cucumbers and onions tightly. Fill jars up to the neck, leaving about an inch space for boiling and sealing. Add the last grape leaf on top with some more onion slices, and 1 garlic piece.

5. Once the jars are filled, pour the brine into the jars (using a canning funnel). Leave an inch space from the rim. Wipe the rims with a damp washcloth. Put lids and rings on, tightening evenly.

6. Place filled jars into the canning pot, with water just to the necks of the jars. Bring water to a boil for about 10 minutes — depending on how fast the water heats up. Some preparations only require to keep the pickles-filled-jars in an almost boiling water to prevent the cucumbers from getting too soft —not leaving the pickles boiling for too long in the water.

7. After the process, remove jars using a jar lifter. Set on a towel and let it cool. Avoid extreme temperature change. Cover the top with another towel if necessary.

8. After jars have cooled off; check for seal, lids have to be sucked down, not bulged out. Pickles in unsealed jars can be consumed first or be put in the refrigerator. Label jars or lids: name of the finished product, date or year. (Ex. Dill Cucumber Pickles (A.Cider), 2015). Store in dark, cool temperature.

Suggested Measurement for smaller batches: (If for some reason your brine preparation was not enough)

3 cups water
1 and 1/2 cups – cider vinegar/freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 and 1/2 – 3 tablespoon salt (preferably canning salt because it is pure, no anti-caking agent)

Pickle Ingredients

Cucumber Pickles - Water boiling process

Cucumber Pickles – Water boiling process

Homemade Cucumber Pickles

Homemade Cucumber Pickles

Homemade Pasta Sauce: Canned/Jarred

One of the best ways to preserve your extra tomatoes is to can them. Ripe tomatoes can be processed be in it puree, juice, wholes, halves, mashed, or in seasoned formed; pasta/spaghetti or marinara sauce. This past summer some of my busy time was spent in food storing and preservation. I have done a lot of canning and freezing –mostly from the abundant vegetables we have from our garden. Canning process can be time consuming but it is so worth it. I enjoy seeing my finished product, and love the fact that I am more than capable of preserving healthy food in a most efficient and cost-effective way.

My recipe below is not limited to what you can do to enhance the flavor of your pasta sauce. There are other ingredients you can add if you want to meet your desired flavor. You may adjust the amount of ingredients if you wished to do so.

Classification: Vegan

PASTA SAUCE INGREDIENTS:

tomatoes, diced – 4 quarts (16 cups)
green beans, diced – 4 cups
celery, diced – 4 cups
yellow or zucchini squash – 3 to 4 cups
carrots, diced – 2 cups
onion, diced – 2 cups
garlic, chopped – 3/4 to 1 cup
parsley flakes (dried leaves) – 2 TBspoons (fresh, 3/4 – 1 cup)
basil, dried – 2 TBspoon (fresh 3/4 to 1 cup)
marjoram seasoning (spice mixture) – 1 and 1/2 TBspoons (optional)
coconut oil – 1/4 to 1/2 cup
sea salt – 1/4 cup or to taste (more or less)

Note: If some seasonings are not available, you may use what you have. Just experiment 🙂

STEPS in Making Pasta Sauce:

1. In a large cooking pot, saute garlic and onion in cooking oil for about one minute.
2. Add green beans and cook for about 3 minutes.
3. Put celery, zucchini/yellow squash and carrots. Cook for another 2 minutes.
4. Add diced tomatoes. Mix thoroughly. Bring to boil for 3 minutes.
5. Add remaining ingredients: spices and salt.

Your pasta is now ready to eat… Umm wait, ready for canning process! 🙂

MATERIALS NEEDED IN CANNING PASTA SAUCE

8 mason jars, washed and sterilized
8 pairs of lids and rings
water bath/boiling pot
canning rack
jar lifter
canning funnel

STEPS IN CANNING HOMEMADE PASTA SAUCE:

1. Follow the steps in preparing the materials needed in canning: choosing jars, washing and sterilizing. Read more information here for general instructions on canning preparation.
2. In a canning pot put 3-4 quarts (16 cups) water and set it on mid-high heat temperature. While water is warming up…
3. Use a funnel, fill each canning jars with homemade pasta sauce leaving about an inch head space.
4. Wipe jar rims using a clean, damp, washcloth.
4. Place lids and rings, closing it tight enough but not too tight.
5. At this point water in the pot is hot, ready for canning process.
6. Place all the ready-to-process canned pasta sauce in the round canning rack. OR use a jar lifter if you put the jars individually in a pot of hot water.

Note: If your canning pot doesn’t have a canning rack, place a folded towel at the bottom of the pot to prevent jars from from breaking.

7. Make sure that water is about 1-2 inches above the canning jars.
8. Cover canning pot. Set the temperature to high heat and bring water to boil. Once the water reaches to boiling point reduce to medium heat for 60 to 85 minutes – for water bath canning for 1000 ft. Altitude above sea level, or 25 minutes for pressure canning process.
9. When canning process is finished, lift pot cover away from you to prevent hot steam away from you.
10. Using a jar lifter, remove each canned homemade pasta sauce. Place it on a drying rack or towel to cool off — away from sudden temperature change and draft.
11. You will hear popping sounds as the hot air inside the jars create a vacuum sealing the food inside. Once the jars are cooled, check for unsealed jars. Sealed jars have sucked down lids while unsealed jars are bulged. You may reprocess the content of the unsealed jars placing it in a new sterilized mason/canning jar, with new lid and ring. OR you may eat the content of unsealed jar right away. It should stay in the refrigerator for a few days up to a week.

Note: Should you plan to wait and refrigerate food in canning jars before canning them, let jars sit for a few hours in a room temperature before canning them. Sudden temperature change can cause jar breakage.

12. Remove rings. Put label on the lids: write name and date. Store canned food in cool and dry place.

Note: Jar rings are reusable unless they are deformed and loaded with rust. Loosen the rings OR wipe them dry if you must keep the rings on the jar to avoid rusting.

Your canned homemade pasta sauce is ready to eat whenever you want them. Storage life last for 2-3 years and beyond. Nutrient value and food appearance/color may deteriorate over time the longer it stays in the jar but it is still good to eat. As long as the jar is kept sealed the food inside is still guaranteed to be edible! 🙂 Enjoy canning!

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Canned Blackberries: Homemade Juice

My husband and I moved to the country side several years ago. We like being in place where we can have more ‘freedom’; freedom to hang/dry clothes outside under the free sun-dryer, freedom to have a garden, and a much less city/community regulations to deal with. We can’t help but count the blessings we have around us here; free fresh air, larger area for our fruit trees, vineyard, and garden, and beautiful nature and creatures surrounding us. We are also blessed to have free seasonal fruits wildly growing in our land property, like wild Persimmons, Blackberries and Muscadine grapes. Last year and in the previous year I was able to preserve some wild Blackberries and Muscadine grapes.

This time I am sharing with you how I can my blackberry fruits (for juice concentrate) using water bath canning. You can also can Blackberry jam, sauce or plain using water bath (water boiling) process.

INGREDIENTS:

ripe Blackberries
water
sugar (optional)

THINGS YOU’LL NEED for WATER BATH CANNING:

cooking stove
canning pot with a rack (If you do not have a canning pot with a rack, you may use a regular big pot, place a folded towel at the bottom of the pot to prevent jars from breaking. If you have a pressure canner you can use it as well but you do not need to tight-lock the cover during the process.)

mason/canning jars
lids
metal bands/rings
funnel
jar lifter

STEPS:

1. Check canning jars for nicks, cracks, and sharp edges (feeling it with your finger tips. Do not reuse damaged jars, dented lids and rusty rings). Wash and sterilize mason jars, lids and bands in hot water. Do not wash lids with soap. Washing the jars in a dishwasher will make the job faster. Keep jars hot and clean until it’s needed.
2. Boil 3-4 quarts (12-16 cups) or more depending on your need of water for about 3 minutes.
3. Wash and drain fresh blackberries.
4. Put in each jar about 2 cups or half a jar of blackberries. Put 1 to 2 teaspoon sugar.
5. Using a canning funnel fill each jar with boiling water leaving about one inch space from the top.
6. Wipe jar rims (opening area) with clean damp cloth.
7. Place lids and band tight, but not too tight.
8. Put ready-to-process jars in the canning rack. Place in the canner.
9. Fill canner with hot water covering about an inch above the jars. You may use the hot water you just used in sterilizing the canning jars.
10. Cover the water bath canner.
11. Set the heat on high until water boils.
12. Reduce heat to medium and let it process for 15 minutes.
13. After the process lift the cover away from you to prevent hot steam from your face or arms.
14. Using a jar lifter slowly lift each jar and place it on a towel or metal rack away from sudden temperature change or draft.
15. As the jars cool off, you will hear a popping sound as the air inside the jars create a vacuum sealing the food inside.
16. When the jars have cooled off, check each jars. Sealed jars should have sucked down lids/cover. Unsealed jars are bulged. You can feel it with your fingers.
17. Remove bands (If you must keep the bands/rings on the you should wipe it dry otherwise it will rust. It is wise to remove the rings because it’s reusable). Put label, dates, names and store in a cool, dry place.
18. You can reprocess the content of the unsealed jars by transferring it to a different clean mason jar, using a different lid OR you may refrigerate or consume the food right away.

You now have a freshly canned blackberry juice ready to use whenever you want. It is best to wait for a few months before you use the content inside to give it time to ferment. Dilute each jar of canned blackberry juice with 2-3 cups of water. Mix with sugar, ice cubes or other real juice of your choice… And enjoy!

Note: After draining the juice, you can refill the jar with water with the blackberry pieces inside and let it soak inside the refrigerator. You should be able to use the juice after a few days. Juice concentration may be less but it’s still good. 🙂

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Canned Green Beans: Plain (Homemade)

One of the things that keep me busy this summer is our not-so-small backyard garden. With all the vegetable harvest we have [in abundance], so far I was able to preserve about 70 total quarts of vegetables by canning, and 40 quarts [zip bag] frozen veggies. Last year and in the previous year I was able to can vegetables and fruits as well.

In my native land, Philippines, a few of the common methods of food preservation are drying, salting and some dehydrating. I have not done nor heard of [home-made] canning before until I came to the US many years ago. My mother-in-law does it every year during garden season and when there are abundant fruits in season. With the knowledge she shared with me, and from reading and hands-on experience over the years, I can say I am one of those proficient ‘home canners’. 🙂

So what is canning? Read a brief history of canning.
Canning is not limited to beans and legumes, fruits and vegetables only. Animal products such as red meat, fish, seafood, and other perishable food products can be processed and canned as well. I enjoy canning even though it takes times to do it. I love the fact that other than eating fresh; I am able to preserve it and enjoy it throughout the year (and many years) even though the vegetables and fruits are no longer in season — without buying it. I know for sure it’s cost-effective and healthier for me!

There are two ways you can can your vegetables and fruits; by pressure canning and by water bath canning. In canning green beans or long beans I typically do the pressure canning method which is the best way to do in less acidic fruits and vegetables.

In this preparation I only season the beans with salt. Other times I seasoned my green beans or long beans with garlic, onion, soy sauce, oil and other seasonings, before packing them. Once you are comfortable in doing canning you can experiment in your seasoning and mixing with other vegetables.

THINGS YOU’LL NEED:

pressure cooker
7 quart mason/canning jars
7 pairs metal rings and lids
funnel
jar lifter

INGREDIENTS:

green beans or long beans (or a combination of both)
water
pickling/canning salt

Materials Preparation:

1. Check canning jars for nicks, cracks are rough [lip] surface. Do not use if jars are not in perfect condition for it affects the canning process. Used jars can be reused as long as they’re in perfect condition.
2. Make sure lids are not dented. Rings should not be too old and rusty.
3. Wash canning jars with soap and hot water. Rinse thoroughly. You can also wash canning/mason jars in a dish washer. If the jars are really dirty wash them with soap and water, and boil them in hot water for 3-5 minutes. Keep the mason jars clean until you need it.
4. Wash or soak lids and metal rings in a hot water. Some manufacturers require you to boil the canning lids. Wash rings and make sure they are in good condition.

Ingredient Preparation:

1. Sort and wash young and tender green beans (or any beans; long, wax, Italian).
2. Remove stem and blossom ends or any “strings”.
3. Cut about 1 to 2 inches length (or you may choose whole pieces).
4. In a big pot put about 3 quarts of water (12 cups). Bring it to boil for about 3 minutes.
5. Raw Pack: Place cut or whole green beans (or any vegetables) in hot Mason jars. Cover with boiling water leaving 1-inch head space.

* Hot Pack: Pack cooked beans tightly in clean, hot Mason jars leaving 1-inch head space.

6. Put half or a teaspoon canning salt.
7. Wipe jar rims (opening) with clean damp cloth.
8. Place sterilized/washed lids and rings on each jars… Closing it tight.

* Hot Pack – Option on packing beans (or any vegetables) in the jars. Vegetables are precooked in boiling water until heated through. Pack pre-cooked vegetables into clean, hot Mason jars and cover with boiling water. Whenever possible, the precooking water should be used as liquid to cover the vegetables after packing into Mason jars. However, there are a few vegetables, such as green and asparagus, which make the cooking water bitter and undesirable to use, so you may use freshly boiled water.

Canning Process:

9. Place 3 quarts (12 cups) of hot water, canning rack and jars with beans in canner. Always use canning rack as jars may break if set directly on bottom of canner.
10. Look through the vent pipe of the canner before placing cover on canner to make sure nothing’s blocking the hole. Read canner instruction carefully.
11. Place cover on canner and lock securely. Read canner manual carefully.
12. Exhaust air from the canner and jars by adjusting heat to a relatively high setting to obtain a free flow of steam from the vent pipe. Consult instruction book which accompanied your range for recommended heat setting. Reduce heat to maintain a moderate steam flow. Allow steam to flow for 10 minutes.
13. Place pressure regulator on vent pipe. Set burner at a relatively high heat setting, on most range burners, and heat canner until pressure dial gauge registers desired pressure.
14. Process at 11 pounds of pressure – Quarts for 25 minutes (Pints for 20 minutes). For processing above 2,000 feet altitude.

* Altitude and Pressure Chart for Canning Vegetables (based on the Presto Canner manual. Other manufacturer’s chart may vary slightly.)

Altitude Pounds of Pressure for Pints and Quarts
2,001 – 4000 ft. 12 lbs.
4,001 – 6, 000 ft. 13 lbs.
6,001 – 8,000 ft. 14 lbs.

Processing time is the same at all altitudes.

15. At end of processing time, turn burner to “off” and remove canner from heat source.
16. Let pressure drop of its own accord, do not quick-cool. Pressure us completely reduced when the air vent/cover lock and overpressure plug have dropped and no steam escapes when the pressure regulator is tilted.

Note: Do not use the pressure dial gauge as an indicator for when pressure is completely reduced. Attempting to speed the cooling of the canner may cause jar breakage.

17. When pressure has been completely reduced, remove pressure regulator from vent pipe and let canner cool for 10 minutes.

Note: Do not remove the pressure regulator until pressure is completely reduced and the air vent/cover lock has dropped. Always remove pressure regulator before opening the cover.

18. To remove canner cover follow canner manual. If cover seems to stick or is hard to turn, do not force it open. Sticking may indicate that there is still pressure inside the canner. If doubt about pressure being completely reduced, let the canner stand until cool before removing the cover.

19. Lift canner cover toward you to keep steam away from you when opening.
20. Remove jars from canner using a jar lifter. Set jars upright on board or cloth away from draft to cool. When jars are cold, test seal, remove ring bands, label, date, and store in a cool, dry place.

Beans preparation (Long beans [Asian] in this photo)
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Packing green beans using a funnel
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Placing the lids and rings
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Putting canned beans in the pressure canner with 3 quarts hot water (12 cups).
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Air vent’s up (white metal sticking on the front part of the canner cover). Steam flowing (right side) for 10 minutes (set your timer)
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Putting the pressure regulator after 10 minutes of steam flow.
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Pressure dial guage set at 12-13 pounds (for our 4,0001 ft. location) for 15-20 minutes. At this time your fire must be reduced low to meet a steady pressure. It will take a few minutes to adjust to the right setting.
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Removing jars using a jar lifter.
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Canned long beans cooling off.
Canning green and long beans

I hope you are not intimated and overwhelmed by the preparation and canning process. It is fairly easy when you have done it several times. It takes the will to do it, and the end result? It’s rewarding! You must try it! 🙂

Note:
You can also can green beans using water bath (not using a pressure canner) method but the processing (cooking time) takes longer. I will post the preparation a little later. Pressure canning is highly recommended on less acidic vegetables like green beans.